5 Plant Wax Types

Posted: May 27, 2016

Plant waxes are a type of natural wax. There are a variety of wax types within the plant wax category. Learn more about a few of them.

1. Carnauba Wax

Carnauba wax (also called palm wax) is a common plant wax type. It comes from the leaves of the carnauba palm tree native to Brazil. The wax is harvested from the leaves of the plant by drying the leaves and beating them to loosen the wax. It is then refined for use in various products. Carnauba wax has a shiny finish, so it is often used in polishes for cars, shoes, floors and furniture.

2. Soy Wax

Soy wax comes from soybean oil. After the beans are harvested, they are cleaned, cracked and rolled into flakes. The oil is then extracted from the flakes. Candlemakers commonly use soy wax to make unique candle creations. Paraffin wax is another common candle making wax, but it comes from petroleum. Some candle makers choose to use soy wax because it is completely renewable.

3. Jojoba Wax

Jojoba wax is harvested from jojoba plant seeds. The plant is grown in Costa Rica, Israel, Mexico and the U.S. Jojoba wax is commonly referred to as jojoba oil, even though its chemical makeup makes it a wax not an oil. This wax is used in many beauty products due to its protective and moisturizing properties.

4. Candelilla Wax

Candelilla wax comes from the small leaves of Candelilla shrubs native to northern Mexico and the southwestern U.S. It is harvested by immersing the whole plant in acidified boiling water. The wax then floats to the surface of the boiling water. Candelilla wax is frequently blended with other wax varieties to harden them without raising the melting point.

5. Rice-Bran Wax

Rice-bran wax is extracted from crude rice bran, the outer layer of the rice grain. It can be used interchangeably with carnauba wax due to its high melting point. It is commonly used in paper and food coatings, candles and waterproofing.

We are experts at creating the perfect blend for your application. We can help you figure out which wax is best for your product. Contact us to learn more.

Comments

4 Replies to “5 Plant Wax Types”

  1. Gemma says:

    Hi I would like to make my own food wraps but would like to wax to be plant based and environmentally friendly as apposed to beeswax. When a wrap is used it needs the flexibility and stickiness to be wrapped around an item and stay and to have antibacterial qualities. Jojobo oil is usually added to a wax when melted to help with the flexibility. Which wax do you recommend?

    1. Jenn Schultz says:

      Hello and thanks for your inquiry! It sounds like this would be a new product development as opposed to something off the shelf. We’ll reach out to you directly to learn a bit more about your project.

  2. Whitney Maybelle says:

    Can I use Jojoba wax in candle making? I have been using soy and its been great, but I am looking to try something new. Please let me know! Thanks so much

    1. Jenn Schultz says:

      Thanks for the inquiry! You could definitely give Jojoba a try.

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